Living in small spaces is doable and cheaper

Living in small spaces, sometimes called downsizing your house, is another frugal retirement living lifestyle that should be investigated for those that think they cannot afford to retire.

Downsizing in fact was incorporated into all of the lifestyles we have enjoyed. Living on a boat, living in an RV, park model living and living overseas.

We know it can be done and so can you... It sure beats working longer.

Our first experience in downsizing... our boat

When we move from 1800 ft.² house, to our 35 foot sailboat with curved walls, we quickly discovered that items that we thought "essential", were not important.

We admit that moving to a  floating home is a little extreme for some people... but it illustrates the point that downsizing is not only doable, it is fun, and it is cheap.

When you come right down to it, shelter should protect you from the elements, provide a place to sleep, cook,  bathe, and to live.

The boat met all of our needs, moving from a large house to a condo is a lot easier than you think.

Go small, spend less, or continue to work... seems like an easy decision to me.

The way the average family allows their "stuff" to control their lives is beyond our way of thinking...many times in returning to the boat after a summer spent in the USA our luggage consisted of 2 backpacks and our soft sided bag we used for dirty clothes...we had everything we needed already on board.

The first step to living in small spaces

Take a look  at some of the examples, that are not essential, and if eliminated could allow you to retire in a smaller space.

  • Walk into your garage, and start counting the items that you have not used in a year
  • Look into rooms that are seldom used... formal dining room, guestroom, formal living room
  • Look outside your house, same thing,  unused patio furniture, lawns and flower gardens
  • Go in your closet and see what percent of the clothes that are hanging there you have not worn in a year

Then list the items that you use every day

  • Bathroom, shower,  toilet and sink
  • Kitchen, refrigerator, stove, microwave, dishes, silverware
  • Living room, the chair you use to read or watch TV

Compare the two, you will find that you actually utilize probably about 10% of your home on a daily basis.

Doesn't living in small spaces see more doable now?